Preschool Piano: What does your child stand to gain?

You won’t be alone if you were wondering why children are encouraged to start piano lessons early. While every parent would fancy the thought of bringing up the next world famous pianist, enrolling in a preschool piano class doesn’t necessarily mean you want them to become professional musicians.

Musical training helps to develop children’s minds and a preschool piano class with other children remains one of the most popular ways to begin this training.

Here are a few things your preschooler will learn in our preschool piano class:

Impulse control

Children are known to move and act impulsively. However, our preschool piano class would allow your child multiple opportunities to coordinate his/her movements. When songs or stories are acted out, children learn how to control their impulses and move or talk only when they should. Having to sit in a specific place with others and follow directions helps them control their impulses. Even when they are not being actively engaged (listening instead of dancing), they absorb the environment and sounds around them. These are invaluable opportunities for growth and it would help them developmentally for other group situations in life.

Concentration

On the surface preschool piano lessons might look like all fun and games, but in reality it takes a great deal of patience and discipline on the part of the child.  Learning to play with others, following directions, singing only when it’s your turn, singing as you play the piano, how to sit correctly at the piano, which keys to play, how to play gently instead of pounding, and the list goes on!  Internalizing all of these generally requires perseverance.

A preschool piano class helps your child absorb these skills early on. They are learning to focus and be successful at seemingly difficult tasks. Little by little they are acquiring the maturity needed for the day when formal instruction begins.

Listening Skills

Numerous studies have attempted to investigate the benefit of music education in children. One common theme about these studies is the ability of music to improve the listening skills of children. In our preschool piano class auditory skills are fine tuned by listening to voices and sounds of nature and the unique qualities of acoustic instruments. These activities are not only fascinating to children but will definitely be a boost to their beginning reading skills!

Confidence

There is a need to build your child’s self-esteem right from an early age and a preschool piano class offers an effective method of accomplishing that. When children are allowed to be themselves in a safe environment that is loving and kind, they will feel confident to share their music with others.  They experience weekly success with music in class and these seemingly small achievements mean the world to them, building the confidence they need.

Are you ready?

There you have it! Highlighted above are just some of the things your preschooler stands to gain from our preschool piano class. The lessons are specially designed to attract the interest of children and they’ll naturally find them intriguing. Preschool piano class is an amazing way to start your child’s musical journey!

Piano Lessons Without Practice

Maxes at DPS

 

Week by week. Year after year. Students arrive at their piano lesson without practicing their assigned pieces.

Week by week. Year after year. Piano teachers try to find ways to entice students to practice.

Piano students are “let go” from piano studios because they do not practice.

Households are stressed because piano students do not practice.

Piano teachers are loosing students because parents are tired of weekly messages saying “Johnny needs to practice .”

On the other hand…

Playing sports is so much fun! Put on your t-shirt, join your team, play the game together, go home.

Next week? Repeat!

How many of these players will be drafted by a major league team? less than 2.9%.

How many will have a career in sports? Probably a few more.

How many will love the game for life and dabble in it when gathering with friends? I bet 99% of them will at least still enjoy the game.

What does this have to do with piano lessons?

Learning to play the piano has a tradition of discipline, repetition and loneliness. Students may love to come to their lesson every week, it may even be fun; but the daily practice at home… that’s another story.

Is there another way to learn to play the piano and love it?

Here is my vision.

Piano lessons are so much fun! Grab your music bag, join your team, play the piano, go home!

Next week? Repeat!

How many of these pianists will pursue the career of a concert pianist? Probably none.

How many will have a career in music? Maybe quite a few.

How many will love the game for life and dabble in it when gathering with friends?I bet 99% of them will at least still enjoy music the rest of their lives.

Do you see what I see? It’s a beautiful vision of my students  making music at the piano with others. For life.

Will you join me?

Piano Camp: Put on a Show!

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Planning, preparing and executing a piano camp takes time but with careful planning it turns out to be a satisfying endeavor for the teacher and an exciting experience for the students!

Beginning in January, I polled the parents to find out the interest level and available dates. Shortly after I began browsing the many resources available. The model for piano camp has traditionally been group games, crafts, worksheets and rhythm play. I decided to follow a different path in order to challenge myself and inspire the students.  The two major changes I made, were:

  1. Piano Camp for a wide range of ages.
  2. Put on a Show!

Offering a piano camp for ages 5-11 seems like a disaster. However, by mixing the age groups and musicianship levels, I did not have to worry about having enough children enrolled in various groups.  My goal was to have 12 children participate in the piano camp. Why did I stop at age eleven? Two reasons. The 12-year-old students that I know would probably not have enrolled in the same class as the 5-year-old students, so I went ahead and offered a different camp for them.

Usually at the end of the week the students would go home with crafts and worksheets completed with a little verbal summary from me.  Sometimes each student would perform solos or we would prepare a piece to play as a group.  But I took a risk  and instead prepared them to perform an “operetta” . Students had to sing, dance, act out the story and make music together.  By the end of the week they had experienced music in a whole different way, worked as a group and shared their talents and skills with an audience.

 

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How does an operetta become a piano camp? Each day the twelve students shared six keyboards and learned different parts of the songs.  Students were of all different levels and it was great to see how they helped each and worked together.  However, during the performance only two students played the piano while the others had different parts to play on stage.

 

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Interested in doing this next summer? I ordered my operetta here.  Jack and the Beanstalk became “Jackie”, the Con Man became the Con Lady, the Giant was not tall at all – adaptations we made to fit our group and add to the fun.

Did you have a piano camp last summer? What new things did you do?

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Group Piano Q & A

group piano boys
Over the years parents have wonderered about group piano lessons. Here is a short FAQ page that may answer these questions.
1. When is the best age to enroll in group piano?
For preschoolers group piano is a magical and playful way to discover the world of music. Likewise, elementary school age beginners and even those who’ve had previous experience, benefit from the structure, friendship and growth that group piano offers!

2.  Do you finish the book in one semester?
 Each student in class works at his/her own pace in technique and application to the songs being learned. One book is normally completeted in one school year. 

3.  Aren’t private lessons better than group?
 If you’re child enjoys making memories with friends and meeting them in a safe friendly environment, group piano lessons are ideal. At the same time the group environment lends itself to the opportunity to include additional musical activities such as “piano band” and piano games.
Private piano lessons are recommended for those students who are willing to commit to 5 -10 hours of practice each week.

4.  How are the students grouped?
At Dorla’s Piano Studio preschoolers are grouped by age, then starting at age 8 students join a Mixed Age Class that most fits their needs. In the Mixed Age class each student works at his/her own keyboard to complete the assignments under the teacher’s guidance.

5.  What do you do if the pace of one student varies greatly from the rest? 
That’s the beauty of the Mixed Age class! Each student in class works at his/her own pace in technique and application to the songs being learned at his/her own level.

6.  Do parents watch, or are kids dropped off?
 Parents are always welcome to stay during class, however I ask that they do not interrupt, interact or talk while in the classroom.  Normally parents stayed outdoors and created their own social gathering.  
What are your concerns about group piano?

Summer Piano – part 2

Playing music at the seashore. Beautiful female hands, piano key

 

Read Part 1 here

Today I share with you what other teachers have planned for their Summer Piano. Enjoy!

What are your plans for teaching this summer?